New paper in press in Cere­bral Cor­tex: Wöst­mann et al. on ignor­ing degrad­ed speech

Audi­to­ry Cognition’s own Mal­te Wöst­mann is in press in Cere­bral Cor­tex with his lat­est offer­ing on how atten­tion­al con­trol man­i­fests in alpha pow­er changes: Ignor­ing speech can be ben­e­fi­cial (if com­pre­hend­ing speech poten­tial­ly detracts from anoth­er task), and we here show how this change in lis­ten­ing goals turns around the pat­tern of alpha-power changes with chang­ing speech degra­da­tion. (We will update as the paper becomes avail­able online.)

Wöst­mann, M., Lim, S.J., & Oble­ser, J. (2017). The human neu­ral alpha respon­se to speech is a proxy of atten­tion­al con­trol. Cere­bral Cor­tex. In press.

 

Abstract

07. March 2017 by Jonas
Categories: Adaptive Control, Attention, Auditory Cortex, Auditory Neuroscience, Auditory Perception, Auditory Speech Processing, Degraded Acoustics, EEG / MEG, Evoked Activity, Executive Functions, Neural Oscillations, Noise-Vocoded Speech, Papers, Perception, Psychology, Publications, Speech | Comments Off on New paper in press in Cere­bral Cor­tex: Wöst­mann et al. on ignor­ing degrad­ed speech