New pre-print paper out: PhD stu­dent Leon­hard Waschke on the states and traits of neur­al noise

PhD stu­dent Leon­hard Waschke goes live (pre-peer-review) with his work on the states and traits of neur­al noise.

Here is the preprint of the paper, which now will under­go peer-review. Thanks for check­ing it out!

27. January 2017 by Simon Grosnick
Categories: Uncategorized |

Sto­ry time: Hen­ry & Obleser (2012) revis­it­ed

Sto­ry time: Some time in ear­ly 2011, I sat down with an Amer­i­can, fresh PhD grad­u­ate who had just joined my new lab, in a Leipzig bar (Café Can­tona; if you are inter­est­ed you can find this great 247 bar with exquis­ite food also in the acknowl­edg­ments of, e.g., Obleser & Eis­ner, Trends Cogn Sci, 2009).
To the day, I could still point you to the table she and I sat down at, and the wall I faced (which is notable because we actu­al­ly spent an unhealthy amount of time and mon­ey there over the years). Soon there­after, we grabbed a beer mat and start­ed scrib­bling waves and marked where we would place so-called tar­gets (psy­chol­o­gist lin­go) and talked a lot of gib­ber­ish about fre­quen­cy mod­u­la­tion. I remem­ber vidid­ly that I had just read an insane­ly long review paper on neur­al oscil­la­tions by Wolf­gang Klimesch (that, more in pass­ing, cit­ed old-school tales of Schmitt fil­ters by the late great Francesco Varela or pio­neers  sound­ing like record pro­duc­ers, Dust­man & Beck, 1965), while the young Amer­i­can oppo­site me turned out to be an—if adventurous—die-hard expert on audi­to­ry psy­chophysics.

Who would have thought that this very night would car­ry me towards tenure in three years’ time, and her around the globe as an esteemed young col­league.
When I nowa­days check Google schol­ar, I am amazed to see that already more than 100 oth­er papers have cit­ed what direct­ly grew out of that beer mat one and a half years later—not count­ing the many more papers this said post­doc, Mol­ly Hen­ry, has pro­duced since.

Here is the link to how excit­ed we were when the paper appeared in PNAS in 2012, and a link to the lit­tle movie a ger­man sci­ence pro­gram kind­ly pro­duced on all of this in 2013.

13. January 2017 by Jonas
Categories: Auditory Cortex, Auditory Neuroscience, Editorial Notes, Neural Oscillations, Papers, Psychology |

MSc stu­dent Lea-Maria Schmitt wins Col­in Cher­ry Award 2017

Wow: Mas­sive con­grat­u­la­tions to Lea Schmitt, who just has been award­ed the Col­in Cher­ry Award 2017 at the 9th Speech in Noise (SPIN) work­shop in Old­en­burg. Ger­many. The Col­in Cher­ry award hon­ours the best poster (audi­ence award) and gets you a cock­tail shak­er set.

Lea’s work, which formed her MSc the­sis, is both provoca­tive and imag­i­na­tive: Lea went after the ancient tru­ism that clos­ing your eyes helps you in dif­fi­cult lis­ten­ing sit­u­a­tions. Turns out it’s not that sim­ple, but Lea estab­lished a very neat link to indi­vid­ual dif­fer­ences in alpha-power dynam­ics. Watch this space for a new paper to come (Schmitt, Obleser, & Wöst­mann, forth­com­ing).

Lea is not only the first stu­dent to receive her MSc in the new Obleser lab in Lübeck, but (maybe not so) inci­den­tal­ly, she was main­ly super­vised by a for­mer Col­in Cher­ry Award win­ner him­self, Obleserlab’s own Malte Wöst­mann. Con­grat­u­la­tions to both!

06. January 2017 by Jonas
Categories: Attention, Events, Executive Functions |

SNAP Work­shop 2017 — Save the date (08|09 Dec 2017)

After great suc­cess in the past, we are proud to announce a new SNAP Work­shop in 2017. It will take place at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Lübeck in Decem­ber 2017 — save the date!

SNAP will gath­er 12–14 speak­ers and about 50 or so par­tic­i­pants for com­pa­ra­bly exten­sive talks and dis­cus­sions in a two-day event, to be held amongst the pit­toresque sur­round­ings of UNESCO world her­itage city Lübeck (near Ham­burg). A poster ses­sion will be arranged. All details to fol­low.

21. December 2016 by Simon Grosnick
Categories: Uncategorized |

New project with Gesa Hartwigsen (Max Planck Leipzig): What is Angu­lar Gyrus actu­al­ly up to?

San­ta struck ear­ly this year: The Deutsche Forschungs­ge­mein­schaft (DFG) has just grant­ed AC head Jonas (Uni­ver­si­ty of Lübeck) and brain-stimulation wiz Gesa Hartwigsen (now a group leader at AC’s for­mer insti­tu­tion, the MPI in Leipzig) a joint 3-year grant, worth 371,000 € in total, on “Mod­u­lat­ing neur­al net­work dynam­ics of speech com­pre­hen­sion: The role of the angu­lar gyrus”. This project will build on Gesa and Jonas’ recent paper in Cor­tex on the top­ic. Thanks again to the fund­ing body and the help­ful review­ers!

21. December 2016 by Jonas
Categories: Adaptive Control, Degraded Acoustics, Grants, Gyrus Angularis, Semantics, Speech, TMS, Uncategorized |

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