New paper in press in the Euro­pean Jour­nal of Neu­ro­science: Wöst­mann et al demon­strate that the pow­er of pres­tim­u­lus alpha oscil­la­tions direct­ly relates to con­fi­dence in pitch-dis­crim­i­na­tion

What is the mech­a­nis­tic rel­e­vance of neur­al alpha oscil­la­tions (~10 Hz) for per­cep­tion? To answer this ques­tion, we analysed EEG data from a task that required par­tic­i­pants to com­pare the pitch of two tones that were, unbe­knownst to par­tic­i­pants, iden­ti­cal. Impor­tant­ly, this task entire­ly removed poten­tial con­founds of vary­ing evi­dence in the stim­u­lus or vary­ing accu­ra­cy. We found that high­er pres­tim­u­lus alpha pow­er cor­re­lat­ed with low­er con­fi­dence in pitch dis­crim­i­na­tion. These results demon­strate that the rela­tion­ship of pres­tim­u­lus alpha pow­er and deci­sion con­fi­dence is direct in nature and, that it shows up in the audi­to­ry modal­i­ty sim­i­lar to what has been shown before in vision and somatosen­sa­tion. Our find­ings sup­port the view that low­er pres­tim­u­lus alpha pow­er enhances neur­al base­line excitabil­i­ty.

The paper is avail­able as preprint here.

29. October 2018 by Jonathan Mortensen
Categories: Auditory Cortex, EEG / MEG, Papers, Perception, Publications | Comments Off on New paper in press in the Euro­pean Jour­nal of Neu­ro­science: Wöst­mann et al demon­strate that the pow­er of pres­tim­u­lus alpha oscil­la­tions direct­ly relates to con­fi­dence in pitch-dis­crim­i­na­tion