Categories
Job Offers Uncategorized

Job alert in the Obleser lab! We are look­ing for a data sci­en­tist / neuro/ com­put­er scientist

Check out this new job ad (dead­line Dec 16), if you are inter­est­ed in work­ing on the com­plex­i­ty of high-dimen­sion­al neur­al data (and how to ensure its anonymi­ty) in this excit­ing new project with many col­leagues from Uni Lübeck and com­pa­nies around us.

This post is espe­cial­ly suit­ed for tal­ents look­ing for slight changes in their career tra­jec­to­ry (psy­chol­o­gists going data sci­ence, IT spe­cial­ists going neuro/health, or such).

Hold­ing already a doc­tor­al degree is nice but not a strict must-have at this stage.

Hit me up with any ques­tions you might have. — Jonas

 

 

Categories
Memory Papers Publications Sleep

New Paper in PNAS by Ngo et al. enti­tled “Shap­ing overnight con­sol­i­da­tion via slow-oscil­la­tion closed-loop tar­get­ed mem­o­ry reactivation”

Sleep is cen­tral for our abil­i­ty to trans­form new­ly acquired infor­ma­tion into sta­ble mem­o­ry traces. A process hypoth­e­sized to be medi­at­ed by unique brain oscil­la­tions found sole­ly dur­ing sleep, first in fore­most the <1 Hz slow oscil­la­tion, which ini­ti­ate a reac­ti­va­tion of the infor­ma­tion to be con­sol­i­dat­ed. But what is the tem­po­ral rela­tion between sleep slow oscil­la­tions and mem­o­ry reactivation?

Togeth­er with Bern­hard Staresina from the Uni­ver­si­ty of Oxford, Hong-Viet V. Ngo recent­ly pub­lished a study uti­liz­ing tar­get­ed mem­o­ry reac­ti­va­tion (TMR): a tech­nique to exter­nal­ly dri­ve reac­ti­va­tion by expos­ing sleep­ing sub­jects to audi­to­ry reminder cues. Using this approach, they com­pared the impact of slow oscil­la­tion phase on the TMR out­come, i.e. they con­trast­ed a cue­ing phase-locked to slow oscil­la­tion peaks (up-states) vs. cues pre­sent­ing dur­ing slow oscil­la­tion troughs (or down-states). Their results show that up-state cue­ing led to a sig­nif­i­cant­ly low­er for­get­ting than down-state cue­ing. More­over, elec­tro­phys­i­o­log­i­cal brain pat­terns reflect­ing reac­ti­vat­ed infor­ma­tion were more pro­nounced after up-state cue­ing. Alto­geth­er these results pro­vide impor­tant insight for the endeav­or to exper­i­men­tal­ly mod­u­late mem­o­ries dur­ing sleep.

You can find the full arti­cle here.

 

 

Categories
Attention Memory Papers

New Paper in Sci­en­tif­ic Reports by Lui&Wöstmann

A tick­ing clock in the liv­ing room; an ambi­ent music in the café; the foot­steps of a passers­by on the street – We are sur­round­ed by a pletho­ra of dis­tract­ing events with reg­u­lar tem­po­ral struc­tures in dai­ly life. Can we ignore these dis­trac­tors better?

Tro­by Ka-Yan Lui and Malte Wöst­mann recent­ly pub­lished a study on the effect of tem­po­ral­ly reg­u­lar ver­sus irreg­u­lar dis­trac­tors on the abil­i­ty to main­tain items in mem­o­ry. Sur­pris­ing­ly, they found that the tem­po­ral reg­u­lar­i­ty of dis­trac­tors did not have an effect on participant’s mem­o­ry per­for­mance. Instead, they found an effect of the tem­po­ral reg­u­lar­i­ty of dis­trac­tors on response behav­iour – par­tic­i­pants were faster and more biased in respond­ing whether the cur­rent num­ber matched with the num­ber in memory.

These results have the­o­ret­i­cal impli­ca­tions: exter­nal dis­trac­tion may have a more per­va­sive influ­ence on dif­fer­ent aspects of cog­ni­tive process­es than mem­o­ry main­te­nance. The arti­cle will soon be avail­able in Sci­en­tif­ic Reports.

Categories
Attention fMRI Memory Papers

New paper in Neu­roIm­age, Lim et al.

Atten­tion lets us focus our lim­it­ed cog­ni­tive resources on behav­ioral­ly impor­tant infor­ma­tion. Less obvi­ous is that atten­tion also helps us to hold infor­ma­tion in mem­o­ry with high pre­ci­sion. But how does the brain imple­ment this direct­ed atten­tion to mem­o­ry, and what behav­iour­al ben­e­fits does it yield for us humans?

For­mer post­doc Sung-Joo Lim (now at Bing­ham­ton Uni­ver­si­ty), Jonas Obleser, and a team of col­lab­o­ra­tors from Old­en­burg (Chris­tiane Thiel) and Leipzig (Bern­hard Sehm, Lorenz Deser­no, and Jöran Lep­sien) have now a new arti­cle on this old prob­lem, to appear in NeuroImage.

Using the changes in brain blood oxy­gena­tion as mea­sured with fMRI, this study demon­strates that atten­tion enables mem­o­ry main­te­nance of speech sound infor­ma­tion across mul­ti­ple brain regions. A speech-sen­si­tive brain region in the tem­po­ral lobe (the left supe­ri­or tem­po­ral sul­cus) con­tributes the most in pre­dict­ing the indi­vid­ual gain in recall pre­ci­sion of audi­to­ry objects from mem­o­ry. This study high­lights that func­tion­al­ly dis­crete brain regions work togeth­er in main­tain­ing and atten­tion­al­ly enhanc­ing work­ing mem­o­ry infor­ma­tion, but they exert dif­ferental influ­ences depend­ing on their func­tion­al specializations.

The full arti­cle is now avail­able here.

Categories
Brain stimulation Memory Papers Psychiatry Publications Sleep

New Paper in Jour­nal of Sleep Research by Wein­hold et al.

In a col­lab­o­ra­tion with Sara Lena Wein­hold and Robert Göder at the Chris­t­ian-Albrechts-Uni­ver­si­ty Kiel, Hong-Viet V. Ngo recent­ly pub­lished a study inves­ti­gat­ing the influ­ence of audi­to­ry stim­u­la­tion dur­ing sleep on mem­o­ry con­sol­i­da­tion in peo­ple with schizophrenia.

The study shows that audi­to­ry stim­u­la­tion tar­get­ing slow oscil­la­tions – a key rhythm medi­at­ing mem­o­ry pro­cess­ing – in real-time in peo­ple with schiz­o­phre­nia results in an elec­tro­phys­i­o­log­i­cal response that is sim­i­lar to that in healthy par­tic­i­pants. Albeit an absent effect of stim­u­la­tion on mem­o­ry con­sol­i­da­tion, the authors found the stronger the slow oscil­la­tion enhance­ment the less par­tic­i­pants for­got, i.e., the bet­ter mem­o­ry per­for­mance was, the fol­low­ing morning.

Thus, this paper not only con­firms the over­all fea­si­bil­i­ty of this approach and pro­vides essen­tial elec­tro­phys­i­o­log­i­cal insights. It fur­ther­more high­lights the poten­tial of audi­to­ry stim­u­la­tion to pro­vide alter­na­tive treat­ments for sleep-relat­ed dys­func­tions in patients with schiz­o­phre­nia. The arti­cle is avail­able here.

Categories
Auditory Perception Auditory Speech Processing Speech

Hot off the press: New chap­ter on neur­al oscil­la­tions in speech per­cep­tion by Tune & Obleser

Neur­al oscil­la­tions are a promi­nent fea­ture of the brain’s elec­tro­phys­i­ol­o­gy and tar­get vari­ables in many speech per­cep­tion stud­ies. For the lat­est edi­tion of the Springer Hand­book Audi­to­ry Research – this time focused on speech per­cep­tion – lab mem­bers Sarah Tune and Jonas Obleser teamed up to take stock of what has been learned about the func­tion­al rela­tion­ship of neur­al oscil­la­tions and speech perception.

By focus­ing on core func­tions and com­pu­ta­tion­al prin­ci­ples, the chap­ter offers a par­si­mo­nious account of the sta­ble pat­terns that have emerged across stud­ies and lev­els of investigations.

You can find a preprint of the chap­ter here and the entire col­lec­tion of chap­ters here.

Categories
Ageing Auditory Neuroscience Clinical relevance Editorial Notes Hearing Loss Neural dynamics Uncategorized

It’s a wrap: The ERC Con­sol­ida­tor Project “Audadapt” has suc­cess­ful­ly ended

Six years in our lab with the age­ing, adapt­ing, lis­ten­ing brain and mind cen­ter-stage have come to a suc­cess­ful close.  Jonas’ ERC Con­sol­ida­tor grant had been grant­ed dur­ing the Audi­to­ry Cog­ni­tion lab’s tenure at the Max Planck Insti­tute in Leipzig orig­i­nal­ly, and it has shaped our start and set­tling-in at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Lübeck ever since 2016.

Jonas: “In total almost 500 ses­sions of behav­iour, EEG and fMRI record­ed; more than 160 brave Lübeck folks and their brains fol­lowed lon­gi­tu­di­nal­ly over two years; 25 pub­li­ca­tions put out; and not least two PhDs fin­ished and five post­doc careers kick­start­ed — I am very grate­ful for the help of all these peo­ple, my host Insti­tu­tion Uni­ver­si­ty of Lübeck and the Euro­pean Research Coun­cil (ERC) hav­ing made this all hap­pen. Thank you all.”

All data will be or are already pub­licly avail­able on OSF, and we will update our ded­i­cat­ed AUDADAPT” project page once the final report is in.

Categories
Papers Psychology Publications

New paper in Roy­al Soci­ety Open Sci­ence, Wöst­mann et al.

Malte Wöst­mann, Julia Erb, Jens Kre­it­e­wolf, and Jonas Obleser con­duct­ed a large-scale online study to explore the rela­tion­ship between lis­ten­ers’ per­son­al­i­ty and hear­ing-in-noise. In a large sam­ple (N = 1,103), they found that BIG‑5 per­son­al­i­ty dimen­sions neu­roti­cism and extra­ver­sion explained dis­so­ci­a­tions of scores on estab­lished sub­jec­tive ver­sus objec­tive hear­ing-in-noise tests. This research was sup­port­ed by the Inter­na­tion­al Hear­ing Foundation.

The full arti­cle is avail­able here.